today in black history

June 20, 2021

Piano prodigy Andre Watts, the first artist to appear on "Live from Lincoln Center," was born in Nuremberg, Germany in 1946.

Town Hall on Race Relations

POSTED: May 16, 2021, 7:00 am

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The Keepers of 306, an initiative of the National Civil Rights Museum that engages civic-minded young leaders, will host a live-streamed Town Hall of Tuesday May 25th at 6 pm. The Town Hall, titled ‘Where Do We Go From Here? State of Race Relations & Policies,’ will focus on current racial equality, economics and immigration policies. To register for the event, visit the National Civil Rights Museum website.

The panels for the event are Will Snowden, the Director of the Vera Institute of Justice, from New Orleans, Stephen J. Harrington, Director of External Affairs at Quicken Loans from Washington, DC, and Lily S. Axelrod, Immigration Defense Attorney at Siskind Susser PLLC from Memphis. The panel will discuss the currents state of specific policies on racial equality, economics, and immigration. The conversation will focus on how civic-minded young leaders can learn, evaluate, and take a stand on these particular issues.

The Town Hall is the third installment of Keepers of 306’s series, inspired by the museum’s mission to be a source of education, civic engagement, and action. The first two events discussed the importance of voting in the 2020 elections and featured CNN commentator Bakari Sellers and Tennessee State Senator Raumesh Akbari, and had more than 10,000 views.

“Our initial goal of this series was to implore viewers to become civically engaged and activate change through our votes and presence at the polls,” said Keepers of 306 incoming chair Brooke Jones. “Our work is never done, however; we must remain informed and engaged in the process as policies are evaluated and implemented.”

The National Civil Rights Museum is located at the historic Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, where Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. The museum offers a comprehensive review of the American civil rights movement from slavery to present day. Since opening in 1991, the museum has attracted millions of visitors from around the world, including more than 90,000 students who visit annually. The National Civil Rights Museum is an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institute and was the recipient of a 2019 National Medal Award from the Institute of Museums and Library Services (IMLS), the top national honor for museums and libraries.

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